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The history of Chinese art is the story of influence. The earliest pieces in the Met’s collection show masterpieces of primitive expression and belief. As the world evolved, and intruded, Chinese art began to reflect techniques and images introduced from India and the Western… more >

The Rule of Man

Big Chief Theodore Emile “Bo” Dollis, leader of the Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indian Tribe, performs an impromptu, abbreviated version of the classic song “Indian Red” during the “Spirit of Congo Square” Celebration. New Orleans: A Living Museum of Music.… more >

The Spirit of Congo Square - Indian Red

This inside look at some of the Met’s most fragile works – the textiles – shows the range of preservation techniques required to ready these works of art for display. Combining artistry with technology, Met technicians encounter specimens that are sometimes pristine, but more often… more >

Textiles at The Met

When Hank Aaron beat Babe Ruth’s home run record in 1974, he sealed his place in baseball history. Soon after, he joined other baseball greats in the Baseball Hall of Fame, in Cooperstown, NY. Showcasing stories and players, the Baseball Hall of Fame highlights the careers of the… more >

The Baseball Hall of Fame

As part of a special exhibition honoring Philippe de Montebello, curators who work with the Met’s Drawings and Prints highlight some of the techniques used in restoring some significant works on paper. Acquisitions require a judgment call – can this piece be saved? From GREAT… more >

Drawings and Prints at The Met

To honor retiring Director Philippe de Montebello, the Met’s curators mounted an exhibit featuring some of the most significant acquisitions of his tenure, some of which transformed the Museum’s collections. Three hundred works from varying civilizations and cultures were displayed… more >

Met Curators’ Farewell Tribute to Philippe de Montebello

Influential pieces from designers who revolutionized fashion become a part of feminist history at the Met’s Costume Institute. Sculptural dresses, corset-free constructions and a wildly inventive use of materials and shapes show the depth of this stunning collection. From GREAT… more >

The Costume Institute at The Met

Modern museum architecture showcases fantastic designs that defy structural conventions. From GREAT MUSEUMS: Riches, Rivals and Radicals: 100 years of Museums in America (2006).

Art in Architecture

The National Museum of the American Indian showcases tribal ceremonial objects, which celebrate the past of native peoples, as well as their present and future. From GREAT MUSEUMS: Native Voice:Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

The National Museum of the American Indian

At the National Museum of Mexican Art (formerly the Mexican Fine Arts Center) in Chicago, visitors are treated to an eye-popping experience.  Centuries of colorful Mexican art from both sides of the border explain the roots of indigenous Mexican people. “We don’t want to rewrite… more >

The National Museum of Mexican Art

A Science Museum can be a place of discovery, learning, and fun. Hands-on interaction brings simple wonders of the world to life. From GREAT MUSEUMS: Riches, Rivals and Radicals: 100 Years of Museums in America (2006).

Ah-Ha! Moments

The imagery, the symbolism and the architecture of the Holocaust is presented in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.  Designed by theater producers, the museum tells this tragic story in a unique way. From GREAT MUSEUMS: Riches, Rivals and Radicals: 100 Years of… more >

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Some called them robber barons, but the egos of the successful capitalists in the 19th century helped provide the foundation for some of America’s greatest collections. From GREAT MUSEUMS: Riches, Rivals and Radicals: 100 Years of Museums in America (2006). 

The Exhibitionists

Percussionist Luther Gray performs at the “Spirit of Congo Square Celebration,” sponsored by Tulane University.  New Orleans: A Living Museum of Music.

Luther Gray in Congo Square, New Orleans
Luther Gray in Congo Square, New Orleans

Known as “the nation’s attic,” the Smithsonian Institute tells the story of our country. It’s interesting to note that founding donor James Smithson never even visited the United States. From GREAT MUSEUMS: Riches, Rivals and Radicals: 100 Years of Museums in America (2006). … more >

The Nation’s Attic

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